Lit Lingo

Not sure if you’re ready for an editor? Get a manuscript assessment. You’ve completed your manuscript, and the hard work of writing your book is behind you. Now it’s time to take the “next step” and find an editor—right? While it’s true that your book—no matter how beautifully-written—does need an editor (trust me on this one), choosing the right editor can be tricky. Editing typically falls into three categories: developmental editing, which suggests comprehensive changes to the overall structure and narrative; copyediting, which corrects grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.; and line-editing, a final proofread to catch any lingering typos or errors. So how do you know when your manuscript is “ready” for an editor? And how do you know “how much” editing you need? If you’re struggling to answer these questions, it’s time to consider getting a manuscript assessment before spending excessive time or money on editing. During a manuscript assessment, a professional editor will read and evaluate your book. They’ll send a detailed letter outlining its strengths, weaknesses, and recommendations for your next editorial steps. No changes are made to the text during an assessment; it’s simply an evaluation of your work to help you determine your next best move. Here are four reasons a manuscript assessment can be a great next step for you (and can ultimately save you time and money in the long run!): 1). An assessment can anticipate an editor’s feedback and inspire pre-emptive manuscript changes. Professional editors perform the best manuscript evaluations. With our manuscript assessment, you’re getting an editor’s opinion on your work, at a fraction of the cost of a full edit. Sometimes the assessment alone is enough to confirm problem areas you already suspect in your book, or the feedback may inspire new ideas and connections, enabling you to begin revising right away. The assessment will also typically advise about “how much” editing your manuscript will require—this is incredibly valuable information if you’re considering using the same editor for both...

Last year, we saw an influx of striking and nostalgic book cover design trends, including bold title font, layered silhouettes, and near-omnipresent mustard yellow or teal book covers. In 2021, we’ll see a continuation of some of last year’s trends, as well as some fresh design ideas that can put your book front and center with this year’s bestsellers, and make it look like the memorable work of art that it is....

Depending on a book’s genre and content, it may include a variety of content types. Let’s learn about the most common parts of a book and how to use them in your publishing journey. Books can have some or most of these different parts; some are required while others are optional. They must appear in the correct order and formatted to standard....

They say it’s not what you know, it’s who you know, and this is certainly true in the book publishing world. For many authors (debut authors especially), networking can feel overwhelming and intimidating. Authors can spend a lot of time worrying about whether they're working with the right editor, the best publicist, or the ideal publisher for them and their book specifically. Our advice? Never underestimate the power of a great referral....

Excellent book covers can also serve as a reliable marketing tool, helping to attract your target audience and build your author brand. Communicating all this information can be a tall order for one book jacket. That’s why having a professional designer can make a tremendous impact on your book’s success. ...